A Parent’s First Impression of the King’s Auction

March 22, 2016

I admit it. Tears slipped from my eyes at the King’s auction. It wasn’t because I lost a bid on a cherished item. It wasn’t due to the absolute beauty and depth of Marcus Shelton’s voice, as the King’s Alumnus tenor entertained us with a touching version of “Bring Him Home.” My tears slipped when I watched a video of a King’s alumnus who was forced to leave King’s for several years due to his family’s lack of finances, and what it meant to him to return to the King’s community.

You see, that could be my family.

We transferred our son to King’s Elementary this year from a Shoreline public school and he loves it. King’s speaks his language. The grading and expectations are clearly laid out and King’s makes learning fun by providing hands on learning opportunities. He loves that he can talk freely about his love of Christ here, that his teachers and friends pray with him. We didn’t think we could afford King’s, but our son was getting bored with school, so we prayed about the decision and applied for financial aid. We received just enough – or so we thought.

Since September, I broke my arm and needed surgery ($6500 out of pocket) and my husband’s work truck broke to the point that it wasn’t cost effective to fix. He is self-employed. And isn’t that what happens so often? Life goes on with its unpredictability.

So there I was at the King’s auction, in a room full of generosity, families donating thousands of dollars so that my son could afford to stay and to experience the best teachers and classroom equipment. And the tears slipped. This year, I couldn’t afford to bid on a single live-auction item, but God allowed me to see the faces of the people He is using to bless me.

To the many King’s families who gave time, donations and money. I personally thank you. I hope that you truly know how much of a blessing you are.

 

Click here for more information about the King’s auction or programs that are supported by the generous donations of the King’s community.